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tv   Bloomberg Surveillance  Bloomberg  March 25, 2016 5:00am-7:01am EDT

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oll event. >> if you were like me and drew in the mid 1960's and early
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1970's, you knew one of the best ways to spread the message was through music. be wild ♪ >> it was the birth of a counterculture, and this revolution produced music that wrapped around our hearts and inds and never let go.
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>> let's tyke a trip back in name when everything around us was changing, how belooked, how we thought, and how we felt. >> and certain songs became anthems of those tames. >> it started in san francisco, came about in woodstock and now
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time life proudly presents the best music from those times in the woodstock collection. >> in the mid 1960's, our world was changing and music was becoming more than it had ever been before. we were losing our innocence and the music was reflecting that in style and substance. >> fist, in its sound. and then in its message.
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>> san francisco was the self-declared capital of this. >> and there was a mass . gration from the country ♪ if you're going to san francisco ♪ >> we were trying to turn on and tune in, and the music started speaking to us in new ways. >> it started to speak to our minds as well as our hearts. into a new word crept our minds. psych adelle i can.
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♪ >> this era had a sound track unlike no other. ♪ >> so much of this music empowered us and made us feel like we needed to make a ifference.
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>> it was a time of expanded consciousness and spiritual awakening. >> and the singers and song iters who created it were -- >> the woodstock era was time when it felt like music was important. now that music and all those memories come alive again and you're just a phone call away -- a aving them as you're
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as your very own. >> now time life has put it all together in the woodstock collection, the music of the love generation. >> you will relive the incredible songs and the artists that were part of our lives. >> you will get 174 only hits by the original artists, all digitally remastered by time life to give you perfect sound.
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>> you have the peace songs, the psych adelle i can songs, and the true classics, the music that makes the music of the love generation come alive. >> every c.d. is filled with great songs and great memories long with complete lighter notes telling the story of this infiltrate era.
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>> you could spend hours of time and hundreds of dollars trying to find all the unforgettable hits of the time life generation and you could own this collection of eight c.d.'s for just five easy payments of $29.99 each. that's just 80 cents a song. >> but wait. that's not all. when you order with your credit card we send you absolutely free the summer of love, 40 of t hits from the summer love.
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>> even that's not all. call in the next 18 minutes and get free shipping, a total of 0 c.d.'s from a special name music history. ♪ >> and here's the best part, if the woodstock collection is not the best collection you have ever heard, send it back and we'll refund your purchase price. remember, this collection is not hold? stores. so call now. >> if you have heard the music before, you're going to love it, because -- it was a renaissance period. >> there's just something in there for err human being who loves music. and who was part of that time period. >> listening to the c.d.'s, it was a celebration. >> in 1969 all roads led to
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upstate new york, to something called the woodstock music and art fair. >> they were hoping 50,000 people would show up. and when half a million arrived, they took notice. ♪ >> tommy, didn't you have a chance to play woodstock? >> no kidding. i was in hawaii and got a call to play a pink farm. in my autoby ogg any i admitted turning it down was a really big mistake. woodstock was defining moment and for three days and night the stage was filled with some of the most incredible talent.
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♪ >> new slogans like make love not war, were all around us. >> and generation being fueled by peace and love found its voice in this kind of music. ♪ >> there were songs of protest. . ♪
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waiting to show her crimson and clover come singing songs of love in a world that's constantly changing nights in white satin never reaching the nd >> there were also songs that had a little different kind of message. ♪ you get anything that you
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want t the restaurant one toke over the line sweet jesus going off o the spirit in the sky give e a head with hair, long beautiful hair, shining, gleaming my green tamborine let the sun shine let the sun shine in
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>> many of the artists that came on the scene back then are still with us today. >> and in some ways as big as ever. ♪ it's time you did god knows when but -- you got to change your evil ways baby i know it's not much ut it's the best i can do my gift is my song and this one's for you ♪ >> some of the strongest, most assertive female artists of all time came out of this period. ♪ you and i travel to the beat of a different drum oh, can't you tell by the way i run you're so vain you probably think this ong is about you i've looked at clouds from both sides now
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from up and down and still somehow >> don't go looking for the woodstock collection in stores. it's only available right here from time life. just call the number on your screen or order online. listen in your home and if it isn't the best collection you've ever heard, simply send it back and time life will refund your purchase price. it's that good. so don't wait. call now. >> it started in san francisco, came of age in woodstock, changed us and the world forever. and now time life has put it all together in the woodstock collection. the music of the love generation. ♪ if you're going to san francisco be sure to wear some lowers in your hair
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all the leaves are brown and the sky is gray ♪ >> you'll relive the great times. incredible songs and artists that were very much a part of our lives. ♪ groovin' on a sunday afternoon the beat goes on the beat goes on ♪ >> you have the psychedelic songs, peace songs, feel good songs, and true classics. the songs that make the woodstock collection the music of a love generation come alive. ♪ born to be wild born to be wild it's the time of the season hen love runs high >> every c.d. is filled with great songs and great memories
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along with complete liner notes telling the story of this great era. ♪ sunshine came softly through my window today you got it yeah baby she's got it well, i'm your venus, i'm your fire what's your desire ♪ >> order now and you can own this fabulous collection of eight cd's for just five easy payments of $29.99 each. that's just 86 cents a song. ♪ everything turn turn turn there is a season turn turn turn i'm leaving on a jet plane i don't know when i'll be back again ♪ >> but wait. that's not all. when you order with your credit
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card, we'll send you absolutely free, a two c.d. set called the summer of love. the greatest hits from that once in a lifetime summer. ♪ i'm a man yes i am but i can't help but love you so you're feeling alone and the fish won't bite you need a little bit of soul to put you right ♪ >> even that's not all. call in the next 10 minutes and get free shipping and handling. that is a total of 10 cd's from a special time in american history. turn a whiter shade of gray ♪ >> remember this collection is not sold in stores, so call now. >> tommy, this era was filled with love-ins, unrest, and protest. >> that's right. from all that came a new kind of music called folk rock. ♪ good morning america how are you
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don't you know me i'm your native son morning has broken like first morning here comes the sun here comes the sun and i say it's all right. ♪ ♪ summer breeze makes me feel fine blowing through the jazmine in my mind ♪ >> and yet as serious and meaningful as those times were they also gave birth to a new kind of pop music. ♪ these eyes are crying these eyes have seen a lot of love but they're never going to see another woman like i had with you ♪ cheer up sleepy jean oh, what can it mean to a day dream believer
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kicking down the cobble stones, looking for fun and feeling groovy ♪ >> this music connected our generation. >> not just where we lived but all over the world. ♪ give me some loving give me some loving all right now baby it's all right now brown eyed irl you my brown eyed girl hush-hush i thought i heard her calling my name now hush-hush ♪ >> we even had our own language. we said things like groovy and far out. we went to head shops, too, and the music was always a big part of that experience. on the road again i'm on the road again in the year 2525
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this man is still alive. ♪ sign rns sign, everywhere a sign, walking tout see it ♪ ♪ nights in white satin never reaching the end ♪ >> there were also bands that came out of this era that wednesday on to become legends. ♪ listen to the music whoa, oh, listen to the music does anybody really know what time it is does anybody really care what goes up, must come downforce force spinning wheel not to go round ♪ >> this era started in the mid 1960's. with a generation feeling better thinking and better living would make a better world. music. all kinds of music was changed forever. and this collection shares those times and memories. ♪ good morning star shine the
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earth stands alone they call me melo yellow that's right. >> wow. hearing all of this music again is unbelievable. you could search the internet, scour the record stores, rummage through your attic, or spend hundreds of dollars and you still wouldn't be able to find all of these songs anywhere. but now you can own them all, 174 hits that were so much part of our lives and who we are today. so let that freak flag fly and call now. >> it started in san francisco, came of age in woodstock. changed us and the world forever. and now, time life has put it all together in the woodstock collection. the music of the love generation. hey mr. tamborine man play a song for me monday, monday so good to me ♪
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>> you'll relive the great times, incredible songs, and artists that were very much part of our lives. ♪ it's a beautiful morning i think -- what a day for a day dream what a day for a day dreaming boy ♪ >> you'll get 174 original hits by the original artists all digitally remastered by time life to give you studio perfect sound. on a magic carpet ride don't you want somebody to love don't you need somebody to love hey, i got you, babe i got you babe ♪ >> you have the peace songs, psychedelic songs, happy songs, feel good songs, and the true classics. the songs that make the music
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of the love generation come alive. ♪ i'm going up the country don't you want to go i'm going up the country, don't you want to go keep me hanging on ♪ >> every c.d. is filled with great songs and great memories along with complete liner notes telling the story of this great era. ♪ young hearts can go their way sunday will never be the same ♪ >> you could spend hours of time and hundreds of dollars trying to find all the unforgettable hits of the woodstock collection but time life has done all of that for you. if you order now you can own this collection of eight cd's for five easy payments of $29.99 each just 86 cents a song. ot a black magic woman got a
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black magic woman i can't see me loving nobody but you forall my life ♪ >> but wait. that's not all. when you order with your credit card, we'll send you absolutely free a two c.d. set called the summer of love. 40 of the greatest hits from that once in a lifetime summer. turn your eyes around. be with my girl she's so pretty >> even that's not all. ♪ call in the next two minutes and get free shipping and handling. that's a total of 10 cd's from a special time in american history. ♪ another pleasant valley sunday here in status symbol land ♪ >> here is the best part. if the wood stock collection is
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not the best collection you've ever heard, send it back and we'll refund your purchase price. it's that good. remember, this collection is not sold in stores. so call now. >> the music sounds good no matter what. no matter when you listen to it. and it always will i think. everyone needs this collection in their collection. because it covers everything. >> i put it on with some friends and you can't go three or four songs without somebody going, my god. i haven't heard that in ages. >> the best thing about it is it's all the music, all together, in 10 cd's. >> hey, this show has been a blast. the music and the woodstock collection is just unbelievable. it shaped and defined a generation. i'm tommy james. enjoy the music. >> the preceding has been a paid advertisement for time life's music collection.
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the preceding was a paid program. the opinions and views expressed do not reflect those of bloomberg lp. its affiliates or its
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off, annie load and you put a load right on me ♪ hairdos and about
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packaging, it is about people believing what you are singing about. she was an american girl ♪ >> you will experience so many moments that can only happen at the hall of fame. >> ♪ pretty woman, don't walk on by pretty woman, don't make me cry ♪ >> you will go back to the 1960's and hear songs that make a brock history -- that made rock history. , thisul mccartney historic version of "let it be." be, let it be let it be, let it be ♪
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reeducated, reinvigorated with the ministry of rock 'n roll. ever, the first time rock 'n roll hall of fame has opened up its archive of the rare performances, presenting the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. you will get 145 exclusive performances. you will enjoy amazing jam sessions and one-of-a-kind collaborations from rocks biggest stars. that i would be untrue
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you know that i would be a liar ♪ >> captured digitally to give -- every dvd has over 60 minutes of live performances. >> ♪ sweet emotion >> plus every dvd contains over one hour of bonus features. >> ♪ sweet >> you will see rehearsals, behind-the-scenes footage, and hall of fame induction ceremonies. a recordted to make with words like bob dylan, that sounded like phil spector. >> ♪ out on the street a runaway american dream at night we'd ride ♪ >> when rock and rollers take the stage, who knows what they
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will say? know mick jagger will not be here tonight because he has [beep] toen chicken get on stage with the beach boys. see the first performance in 25 years by cream. i've been waiting so long to be where i'm going ♪ >> this dvd collection is not in any store. but call now, and you can own the entire hall of fame live collection for just four easy payments of $29.99 each. c k in the usa ♪ a dvd ofll get
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historic concerts at madison square garden. 67 stunning performances. >> ♪ it ain't me ♪ >> it's been called the best concert ever. >> ♪ we are stardust we are golden and we've got to get ourselves back to the garden ♪ >> that is a total of nine dvds, more than 20 hours of viewing for the awesome rock 'n roll experience. >> ♪ just like yesterday >> but wait, there's more. call with your credit card and get savings.
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remember, if the rock 'n roll hall of fame live is not the best dvd collection you have ever seen, send it back and we will refund your full purchase price. this special collection is not sold in stores. get the rock 'n roll hall of fame live collection, including the anniversary concerts and free shipping and handling. and don't forget, these incredible dvds will take you behind the scenes, where you will see rock's biggest stars get together and rehearse as they prepare to take the stage for rock's biggest show. to rock 'n invited roll's biggest and most exclusive party, where all the stars and legends come to play and where rock 'n roll history comes alive on stage. >> tonight we are on our best behavior but we are being rewarded for 25 years of bad behavior. ♪ i can't get no
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i can't get no ♪ >> presenting the rock 'n roll hall of fame dvd collection. >> ♪ when the loving starts at the light goes down and there is not another living soul around ♪ keith richards, mick jagger with tina turner, bruce u2.ingsteen with yo i still haven't found what i'm looking for ♪ >> that man was born on the north side of dublin. the number one rock 'n roll guitarist today is my friend right behind me, the handsome one, and he played blues rather than me and most of the others.
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-- he played blues better than me and most of the others. >> and you will hear a dual , in tribute to george harrison. >> ♪ while my guitar gently weeps ♪ and remember, all these incredible performance are only available in the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. >> there was a dude who cared himself more like brando than anyone else. bruce springsteen owned american hearts. from bruce springsteen to
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elvis costello. blondie. >> ♪ call me on the line ♪ myth.tti s >> ♪ because the night belongs to lovers ♪ rem. >> ♪ they put a man on the moon ♪ these dvds will give you a candid look at rock's greatest artists. >> everybody thinks i am kind of downbeat, but things have been good for me for a long time. forget it. >> i have been a total walking contradiction my entire career. i intend to stay that way.
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never cared about money but i always wanted to get paid. i never cared about hit records, but i always wanted to get my songs on the radio. >> ♪ ain't that america you and me ♪ what must people don't realize -- what most people don't realize is that jackson brown is a bona fide rock 'n roll sex star. >> ♪ running on running on empty ♪ ductwould like to now and james taylor into the rock 'n roll hall of fame. >> ♪ i've seen fire and i've seen rain i've seen sunny days, thought they'd never end. ♪ >> ♪ i've been straight up changing
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because i've built my life around you ♪ >> remember, in the hall of fame live dvd collection, you will enjoy the very best moments from 24 years of induction ceremonies. >> i do not have to say much because i am the quiet beatle. >> you sure know how to make a man feel good. >>. and, mainstream manifestation of the american dream. now for the first time ever, the rock 'n roll hall of fame has opened its archive of rare, never before seen performances. presenting the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. >> ♪ more children -- war, children it's just a shot away ♪ >> you will get more than 125 exclusive performances.
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♪ the promised land >> you will enjoy amazing jam sessions and one-of-a-kind collaborations. >> ♪ put on the red light >> performances have been captured digitally to give you brilliant sound. every dvd has over 60 minutes of live performances. >> ♪ the thrill is gone the thrill has gone away ♪ overus every dvd contains one hour of performance features. you will seabird personals -- you will see rehearsals, behind-the-scenes footage. roll'sve you rock 'n greatest jamming blues band, the allman brothers band. not going to catch the
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midnight rider catcht going to let them the midnight rider ♪ >> and when rock 'n roll or , who knows what they will say? dark of the flame. flame? p] i'mows what [bee talking about. >> you will see the first performance in 25 years by cream. >> ♪ i've been waiting so long to be where i'm going ♪ comes with complete liner notes about this historic performances. >> ♪ got a black magic woman got a black magic woman ♪ >> this dvd collection is not in any stores, but call now and you can own the entire hall of fame
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live collection for four easy payments of $29.99 each. now and you will get the emmy award-winning three dvd set of the hall of fame's the store 25th anniversary concerts at madison square garden. >> ♪ here's to you, mrs. robinson jesus loves you more than you can know ♪ >> simon and garfunkel, bruce springsteen, jackson brown, ayers taylor, billy -- james taylor, billy joel, u2. >> ♪ it's a beautiful day ♪ >> that's a total of nine dvds, 24 hours of viewing, for 24 hours of experience. next 10 minutes with your credit card and get free
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shipping and handling. that is a savings of nearly $13. if the rock 'n roll hall of fame live is not the best dvd collection you have ever seen, said it back and we will refund your full purchase price. this collection is not sold in stores, so call with your credit card and get the rock 'n roll hall of fame live collection, including the 25th anniversary concerts and free shipping and handling. don't forget, these incredible dvds will take you behind the scenes, where you will see rock's biggest stars get together and runners as they prepared to take the stage for rock's biggest show. now you are invited to rock 'n roll's biggest and most exclusive party, where the stars and legends come to play and where rock 'n roll history comes alive on stage. >> ♪ start me up when you start me up i'll never stop ♪
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>> presenting the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. k in the usa ♪ >> you will get a front row seat to the most amazing jams in rock 'n roll history. two everything , turn, turn, turn ♪ >> you will enjoy the best of hall of fame induction ceremonies. wonder who will stop the rain ♪ >> you will see candid moments of rockers paying tribute to their heroes. >> there are some giant artists here tonight, but the stones will always be the greatest to me. don't tryou do, guys, to grow old gracefully. it would not sue you.
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they are role models. i love them and i hit them for that. >> ♪ a pinball wizard there has to be a twist ♪ plus, only at the rock 'n roll hall of fame. i am not because they kicked me out. cord.nk god for the power that thunder from down under that gives you the most -- the second most satisfying surge that you can get through your body. >> ♪ i'm on the highway to hell ♪ >> if you like to rock, you will hear ac/dc, and in a special tribute to black sabbath, metallica. zz top.
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and enjoy the all-time southern rock anthem. -- won'tyou fly high you fly high free bird, yeah ♪ >> it is all here in this amazing dvd collection of rare never before seen performances. the rock 'n roll hall of fame live. >> it is a privilege for me to be able to do this tonight and come here. we wanted to be famous. luck, we gavele line we turn you on. john lennon, you made it. god bless you. come together right now over me ♪ two have been reunited with
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people i love very dearly. it is very moving. for they we played first time in 25 years. ♪ i went down to the crossroads fell down on my knees down to the crossroads fell down on my knees ♪ >> ♪ take another little piece of my heart ♪ >> ♪ in the days of my youth i have known what it was to be a man ♪ >> ♪ like the nights in the summer, in the city ♪ >> take it home as a small return on the investment you made in your son. you will go back to the british invasion with the kinks. >> ♪ all day and all of the
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night ♪ >> eric burden of the animals. >> ♪ it's my life and i'll do what i want it's my life and i'll say what i want ♪ >> don't wait. the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. >> i love rock 'n roll. dowhat we get together to each year besides party in a historic way, technology celebrates those artists who have made a big difference shipping us. -- shaping us. >> american music changed my life. god bless america. ever, for the first time the rock 'n roll hall of fame has opened up its archive of rare, never before seen performances. presenting the rock 'n roll hall of fame live dvd collection. out on the street
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a runaway american dream at night we ride ♪ >> you will get 145 exclusive performances. women ♪ky-tonk will enjoy amazing jam sessions and one-of-a-kind collaborations from rock's biggest stars. >> ♪ you know that i would be untrue you know that i would be a liar ♪ 135 performances have been captured digitally to give you studio perfect video and sound. >> ♪ in the name of love >> every dvd has over 60 minutes of live performances. >> ♪ sweet emotion >> every dvd contains over one hour of bonus features. >> ♪ sweet
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>> you will see rehearsals, behind-the-scenes footage, and hall of fame induction ceremonies. >> you will see happiness, unhappiness, and, thank god, a sense of feeling to come to all of us up here on the stage today. >> ♪ because when the loving starts and the lights go down and there's not another living soul around ♪ >> one rock and rollers take the stage, knows what they will say. >> shut up. make me scream like a white lady. you will experience rock 'n roll pioneers, the 1960's greatest groups, guitar gods, legends of classic rock, and you will see the first performance in 25 years by cream. >> ♪ i've been waiting so long to be where i'm going ♪
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>> every dvd comes with complete liner notes about this historic performances. >> ♪ come together right now over me ♪ >> this dvd collection is not in any store, the call now and you can own the entire hall of fame live collection for just four easy payments of $29.99 each. >> ♪ sweet home alabama where skies are so blue ♪ >> but wait, order now and you'll get the emmy award-winning three dvd set of the hall of fame's a story 25th anniversary -- the hall of fame's distort 25th anniversary concerts. 67 stunning performances. >> ♪ it ain't me ♪ 36-pagethis exclusive
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collectors booklet. >> ♪ we are stardust we are golden and we've got to get ourselves back to the garden ♪ >> that's a total of nine dvds, more than 20 hours of viewing for the ultimate rock 'n roll experience. pick up my guitar and play just like yesterday ♪ >> call in the next two minutes with your credit card and get free shipping and handling, savings of nearly $13. >> ♪ we don't get fooled again ♪ >> is the rock 'n roll hall of fame live is not the best dvd you have ever purchased, send it back and we will refund the full purchase price. call with your credit card and get the rock 'n roll hall of fame collection, including the 25th anniversary concerts and free shipping and handling.
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don't forget, these incredible dvds will take you behind the scenes, where you will see rock's biggest stars get together and rivers as they prepare to take the stage for rock's biggest show. >> peace to you all, and made the music set you free. >> music is all you really need, love and music. be♪ let it be, let it let it be, let it be there will be an answer let it be there will be an answer let it be look at this let it be, let it be let it be, let it be whisper ♪ >> the preceding was a paid advertisement for the rock 'n roll hall of fame dvd
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collection, brought to you by star vista entertainment and time life. the preceding was a paid program. the opinions and views expressed do not
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ura.i'm david g all that and more in this issue of bloomberg businessweek. let's meet the editor, alan pollack, the editor of bloomberg businessweek. the first piece in your global economic session, on the
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terrorist attacks. this is home to the european union's headquarters and we know that because one of the bombings to place at a metro station outside. this is a city with a lot of internal tension. >> stepping back from the tragic events of the last week, looking at the city as sort of a tale of two cities, where you have the european union and all of the people who work there. >> bureaucrats. >> and then you look at the people who live in some of the , includinghborhoods some neighborhoods that are heavily -- where they're ours -- where there is high unemployment and where there is this huge economic divide. one of the things we do with is how brussels is run in such a policet it has six forces and has 19 municipalities in it. and just how hard it is. to govern and meld these
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communities together. david: the government does not have a good sense of what is going on. >> they do not have a good sense of what is going on with them, and the national police force is relatively small. belgium is also focused on regional tensions. so tensions have not been spent on melding immigrants into the bigger community at large. david: on the cover this week, twitter,ey, the ceo of an exclusive interview with him. a real turning point for the coupling. what do we learn from hearing from jack dorsey? >> it is a 10th anniversary and twitter is in an odd spot. revenue is up, but they have yet to turn a profit. the big problem is they have plateaued out at 320 million users, which is a lot of users, but it needs to get bigger.
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david: people try it and they do not come back. >> sometimes they do not come back, although 320 million is a lot of users. people are looking to see growth and to see growth in revenue as well, so that is a problem he is dealing with and he has a plan to get twitter to 20 years old. david: we talked to felix gillette, the author of that story, along with sarah frier. >> he wants the world to know that twitter has an identity and it knows what its identity is. what is a good for? is a good for media, for celebrities? twitter never had a strong response. twitter is live, a conversation happening now. it is a public conversation happening all over the world about the events taking place. , and it been the focus
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helps to have some sort of identity in terms of part of the big challenges. , convincing the hundreds of millions of people who have already used twitter. they have to get those people back and give it a second chance. it is harder than getting people to check this thing out for the first time. when i turned to twitter it is during the big event. i gather what jack dorsey wants to do now, create more live events. we used to be the super bowl. let's see if we can make each nfl game a live event and have fans of those teams have conversations in the same way that people gather to talk about the super bowl. and even lower than that, he has very high hopes for periscope, this live streaming app that they bought last year. periscope basically lets anybody
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with a smartphone, turn it into a live streaming device, and on periscopethat but also on twitter, and part of what he sees in the future is suddenly there is live events happening in your neighborhood, like on a much smaller scale around periscope and people broadcasting live around them and people gathering to have watercooler conversations there. twittero you think of and all that it has done, how integrally was to the arab spring -- it was not the company that was really playing a role in that. you have a tremendous set of users who wanted -- it strikes me what is changing now is the company wants to play a more active role in the kind of content that people are using and consuming. >> definitely. they are flexing their editorial muscles for the first time. they built this amazing global
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microphone for people that wanted a microphone. it is a great service. the problem is a lot of people out there do not want a broadcast -- do not want to broadcast anything to the world. for them it is kind of a useless service to do that. so in order to get bigger than 320 million users to get to one billion users, they need to convince people that do not want to broadcast to the world that there is some other reason to be there. , ok,that boils down to is you do not have to tweet to enjoy twitter. come here and you will get to listen. sit back and you can treat it like you are with cable television. have twou are going to insight people to consume media, you have to curated for them. that is what twitter is in the early stages of doing, figuring out how we take this huge fountain of human thought and slicing it and dicing it and making it more presentable to people who are newcomers who
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just want to sit back and say what is going on on twitter. david: how radically different are the two companies? was the ceo before jack dorsey. felix: i do not see a huge amount of difference at this point. jack had come back in 2011 to become executive chairman of twitter. he was there behind the scenes. he was advising the former ceo, so he has been a part of this for a while. having him become ceo again and ,ake on a much more public role i think the major difference is you get jack dorsey's style and vision front and center. they think there is obviously value in that, but this guy has been held that this great tech visionary. he has a vision for the company.
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salespersonnd of that we needed at a time when we needed to step it up in terms of our market, in terms of public relations, in terms of the story that twitter tells the world are about why they need to come back to twitter and give it a try. david: ahead on bloomberg businessweek, the magazine's creative director talks about ceo jack dorsey's pose. propecia, the exclusive danish hair clinic setting up shop in beverly hills. all that ahead on "bloomberg businessweek." ♪
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david: welcome back to "bloomberg businessweek." in this week features section, stephen spinner. the controversial solyndra investment, but now he has created software crucial to politicians getting elected. >> i first met steve spinner when i went out to silicon valley to do a story on the up and coming candidacy of barack obama, who had just challenged hillary clinton and surprised the political establishment i raising enormous amounts of money, raising more money than clinton did. one of the ways he did that was by tapping into silicon valley guys like spinner, who at the time were interested in social networks. spinner, who is an ordinary middle-class guy for silicon valley, not a billionaire by any stretch. david: you write about how he weaponize the algorithm. what has he done?
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josh: after he left the obama administration, he is an entrepreneur and got to thinking about what company can i start, what problem can i solve? the one he knew best was fund-raising. spinner essentially wanted to hadd his software, what he higher neared in obama's first campaign, and the idea that instead of manually going out and calling everybody in your social network and trying to figure out whether they were republican or democrat, passing off a lot of people because he guessed wrong, he and his cofounder wrote an algorithm that essentially you are telling people that you're raising money for -- you upload your contacts the webspiders through and check those names and checks everything from the federal election database, affinity groups, the sierra club, and the software can essentially figure out your politics and figure out who you have given to, who you
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have not given to come and who you would be likely to give two. it returns your contacts to you, optimized by the propensity and whoever orto give to whatever cause you are raising money for. that is a valuable weapon in washington because it is going to be easier to raise more money and give you a competitive advantage over whoever it is you are running against. steve spinner did this after he got out of the obama administration. he oversaw the grant to solyndra. figure now,artisan selling the software to both democrats and republicans. and a lot of people who criticized solyndra are now ponying up to buy this program. that working on the team dispersed the $30 billion or so in stimulus funds that were earmarked, promising clean technology companies. what he and his team did were to
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act like venture capitalists for the government, but they were trying to grow these cleantech industries and create jobs. overall they did an excellent job, investing in tesla and other good firms. solyndra went bust not too long after doe gave them a loan guarantee. up inr's name turned e-mails because he organized the ribbon-cutting ceremony for joe biden at solyndra. it was recognized that this was fundraising. let's make this guy look like a piñata and attack him. strategies ofn mitt romney's campaign was to talk about solyndra, suggesting it was a villainous conspiracy between these fundraisers and obama. it did not work, but one of the great ironies in this piece is that spinner has managed to attract both democratic and republican investors, including folks on the mitt romney
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campaign, who were his former tormentors. they recognized the value in the software, so they have now made amends. david: coming up on "bloomberg businessweek," the states where it is still legal to discriminate against gays, and what corporate america is doing about it. ♪
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> david: welcome back to "bloomberg businessweek." i'm david gura. jeff green writes that the ongoing struggle for equality in the workplace in america's heartland. >> 54% of americans are in a state where if you are gay, somebody can say it i do not want to rent to you or i want to fire you and you do not have legal recourse. you will probably lose if you
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sue because the state law does not reflect protection for those people. >> how are companies navigating that terrain, figuring out how to deal with people in places where culturally it is different than where they might be headquartered? >> most companies protect on that basis, so at least in the workplace you are fine. the issue becomes when you have somebody who is in a protected environment at the moment, you want to transfer them to is not protected, that can be an issue. the focus of the article is looking at where companies are in this process and how it can be difficult if you are in an environment where the broader society is not ready for this kind of discussion. >> you look at hormel foods. what happened there? in 2011 they had a low score. companies are scored on a scale of zero to 100, and they were at 15, which means they were doing nothing.
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they had the basic policy in place that said if you are gay and we find out, we cannot fire you. so they said we are going to improve that. started adding dates to the calendar such as gay pride day and national coming out day. it is a simple thing they handed out every year. i was talking to the head of hr, the senior vice president. he passed this thing out. him,e started e-mailing coming by his desk, saying we do not want this. i guess they thought this would be something like a baby step, but it turned out to be a turning point. some executives said we have to stop this and go back to the old calendar. the ceo said, no, we are going to push forward. david: where does a company like hormel foods turned to guidance as it approaches this? jeff: in this case they did it themselves. there are some best practices out there. there is a group that sets
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standards and you can look at the application. their own employees talked about -- and in some cases, the experiences had directly, one of the people i talked to help the transgender employee with that transition and in the process relies how many of the policies that were in place were counterproductive. they did not realize it because it was something that did not matter to their company. part of it is just realizing you did not have gay employees. david: we have seen in the news states that have tried to pass legislation that would make this discrimination legal. we have seen it in indiana and george as well. ceo's of big companies are fighting against it. how salient is that argument? is it getting through to people on the ground, saying here is a guy threatening to pull jobs out of my state of things do not change? jeff: georgia is one of the states where you can be fired for being gay. they are adding additional protection to states.
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this is adding a layer of protection for religious people in other situations that they field might be under threat. so states like indiana and georgia already allow a certain amount, so that by itself may be hurting them. when these things happen, it can be worse. are 32 states, 200 different bills that the lgbt community considers a threat to their lifestyle. david: i imagine you talked to a lot of people. i wonder if any story stood out to you, someone who might have faced some challenges with recruitment? jeff: there is another company , and attory, eaton least the public perception, she said if it were not for her partner that she had in the state, in ohio, that to her was such a hostile environment, a
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state that you are not naturally protected, that if it were not for this job and maybe her partner, she definitely would not be there. that is what she hears from people trying to recruit. they check out the company, what is the situation? is alreadythat seen as hostile, it is difficult to recruit. david: we introduce you this week to a new global fraternity, an exclusive club that everyone gets in including royals and rock stars. it is a hair clinic. the company means hair as sexy asch is not the name, and basically he rejectsup to -- it several people that apply. it is kind of like a cult. david: so you apply the tonic
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and then you go back and fourth with representatives of the company? >> right. david: i have not heard of it previously. >> it is huge in germany, norway. there is one in dubai. one in tampa was very successful. and they opened an online consultation so you do not have to be in a particular place. scuttlebutt about who is using it? celebrities? -- unfortunately, you have to apply it twice at night and you have to wait a half hour between applications. he is falling asleep between the first and second application. david: next up, forget casablanca.
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this tiny african country is becoming a hub for international power games. that is next on "bloomberg businessweek." ♪
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david: welcome back to "bloomberg businessweek." coming up, how this week's cover got made, and how -- and twitter jack dorsey. the gamble that warner bros. is making on the new film "batman versus superman." david: so many must reads in this issue. in the focus on retirement section, you look at vanguard, more than $3 million under management, and they are pioneering this hybrid of having robo advisors, having people
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decide where to place their money, and also through digital access to financial advisors within the company. ellen: most of the attention has been on startups, betterment and well front, but vanguard has gotten into this business and has immediately become one of the leaders in the field because they already have so much under management. they have added a twist, which is for many of their clients, they do have not just sort of robo advising, but also actually people. you can do chatting on the computer or talk to them by the old-fashioned telephone, and they will try to get a better sense of what your needs are, what your other assets are and put you in the right place. it is interesting that there is this competition between startups, that there is also competition between the startups and these huge players, and
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schwab is in it, too. david: there is a vanguard through-line in this section. one of your reporters tries to track down a pension. there are people with fine benefit pensions. they move from job to job and they lose track of them. she had a heckuva time trying to figure out where this money was. like: it was kind of a detective story. the reporter tried to track down a pension from way earlier in hi her career. the company she had worked for had been acquired, maybe split, and part of it had gone into bankruptcy. so the question was, had the government taken over the pension? it turned out without was not the case. she tried looking it up in various places with organizations that track lost pensions. finally she found it. it happens to be at vanguard. she found it because she talked to someone who had talked to someone who knew where the old pension had gone. it is sort of a warning to people because this happens a
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lot. david: there are government agencies that try to help you with this. she kept running into dead ends. ellen: she went to one agency but they did not handle the states she worked in or lived in, and that became a problem. so she kept moving from agency to agency, talking to people, and she found it. this happens with 401k's, too. it is not just pensions. david: lastly, an incredible piece in the horn of africa, across from yemen. after risen to prominence september 11. of newit is the size djibouti. it has become incredibly important because it is strategically located and it has become a place where lots of countries want to have a military presence. the u.s. has a huge base there.
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china is moving in. many's first space in decades is there. all kinds of nongovernmental organizations are there. it has become the casablanca of this decade. it has that feel. our reporter even goes into a restaurant, where sort of everybody wants to be seen. it has that vibe to it. david: we talked to our reporter. >> starting with september 11, the u.s. after that was looking for a place where it could establish its first-ever military base dedicated solely to counterterrorism, and it looked for places that had access to both middle east and to africa, and djibouti emerged as the most logical place to put a base. what kind of country is
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it today? >> relatively speaking it is quite stable, but it's neighbors are somalia, ethiopia, eritrea. it is surrounded by a lot of countries that are basically on fire. david: what drew you there? a very nascent, growing place when it comes to business and development apparatus. >> one of the reasons was that china recently announced that it was opening its first military base abroad and putting it in djibouti. so you have this dynamic where you have all of these countries that are not necessarily -- they are not enemies, but they are also rising. so you have the u.s., having its biggest military base in the region just four miles from where china is going to open his first foreign military base -- to open its first foreign military base.
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japan is right alongside them. i wanted to see the dynamic of all these countries that are forced to exist side-by-side in a small area and see how that works and how -- what sort of atmosphere results from that. the macro see that at level. you make your way to a bar frequented by businessmen, soldiers from these countries, and that is a microcosm that gives you a sense of everyday life in djibouti. sort of a place that is a local hangout for a lot of the outsiders who come in, and i was told that this place was sort of the melting pot of djibouti. it certainly lived up to that. there were german soldiers, american. there were trench contractors. all sorts of different nationalities mixing, and this has -- it is a really good place to kind of view this dynamic of the country, but it is also attracting the attention and the
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potential problems that all of these different nationalities and different interests coming together in one spot might bring. a couple of years ago, two suicide bombers went into that restaurant, and they were targeting french commandos, blew themselves up, injured more than one dozen people, killed three. so it is kind of this focal , where all ofuti the players come together and you can really see how the country is changing at a really small micro level. david: what do folks from djibouti think of all this attention from folks moving to the capital city? monte: the government of djibouti definitely wants to capitalize on all of this. they want to leverage the interest of the military with private interest. they have this plan that they
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want djibouti to turn into another dubai. within 20 years, they hope that djibouti can be a regional capital for free trade. as for normal djibouti residence, it is a mixed reaction. for example, when the americans came in and started to expand the military base a couple of years ago in 2013, they programd a $1.5 million to really expand the us-based there. basehired -- the u.s. there. they hired foreign workers from countries like the philippines to do that work, and there were protests at the base against the u.s. that led to a change in hiring practices and there was a little bit of tension there. a lot of other people see those military providing stability.
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we mentioned a lot of countries of the neighboring area that have lots of turmoil, and they see the foreign military presence as a possible deterrent , for example, of islamic militants coming in and trying to take over the country. have you ever wondered what goes into making a "number business week" cover? director, robert. robert: very bright covers. we want to stay away from twitter blue or grey. so we tried something completely different. orange and yellow, really bright. then there was this interesting cafe. it was based on the edward hopper painting. chris shot a great portrait there that leads from the inside. the headline twitter
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hashtag. how was that arrived at? robert: it was slightly critical but not overly mean. david: what do you want the photo to convey? robert: he looks quite pensive. in terms of body language, arms crossed, which generally represents that you want to protect yourself or are a little defensive. himwhole story is about being in a slightly defensive position. everybody has a theory of why people do not use twitter more. is not necessarily being attacked, but people are questioning where the company is going to go. david: next up, what it is really like risking your life to bring people to the top of mount everest. plus, the supersonic plane picking up where the concorde left off. and potheadsstors
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need to know about rosin. next on "bloomberg businessweek ." ♪
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david: "bloomberg businessweek welcome back to "bloomberg welcome back to "bloomberg businessweek." i'm david gura. the story in the technology section. i talked to ashlee vance and got the story. arehe company says they going to carve out a 40 passenger jet that would fly faster than the concorde, and 500 think there are about routes, most of them over oceans, that this would apply to. they want to charge less and the and the analysts i spoke to, if they could fill this plane, they think it has a
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chance. to takeys are trying advantage of all the computer stimulation technology, materials, improvements like carbon fiber instead of aluminum . by moving fast and cheap, they think they can bring it to market. david: you check out the prototype, in a hangar that used to belong to john denver. what does the prototype look like? ashlee: you cannot see the actual plane yet. the models they have mocked up are a bit smaller then the concorde. otherwise it looks like the concorde. they have cockpits made out of plywood and can' cardboard. every seat would be an aisle and a window. it is two rows of single seats going all the way through. their hope is to build a third scale plane by the end of next year, and that is when we would see how it flies and if it meets up with the simulations that they run. david: how much of this hinges on materials? this would be a plane built out
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of different stuff and the concorde was? ashlee: it is a big deal. it is the only way you get the price down. they are seeing 30% more fuel efficient, but that is all on paper. we are seeing carbon fiber being used and all kinds of aerospace --panies, version galactic virgin galactic is using that. some designne things around the wing and taking some of the weight out of the plane, but it is the move to new materials that is the way you get there. extrapolatecan we about the startup culture from the way this company is being run? what does it say about startups in america today? ashlee: this one is an unconventional story in that you a former amazon/groupon guy who is the ceo. he has surrounded himself with talented aerospace engineers from the likes of nasa and lockheed martin and boeing, so
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these people have real experience. this kind of thing used to seem withsible, but spacex, and jeff bezos, they have proved that you can be a startup within aerospace and you can run pretty lean before the costs go dramatically up. david: you have a new show coming out. "hello, world." what is it? ashlee: it is a tech/travel show that focuses on all over the country, and shows you the tech outside of silicon valley. we go to new zealand, iceland, places like that, showing your products and beautiful scenery along the way. david: thank you so much. etc. section, why nobody smokes flowers anymore. i'm talking about pot.
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marijuana concentrate. >> if you are 30 or so or under, you are not using marijuana in the same way that gen xers did. david: smoking it like a cigarette, using a bong? >> you are probably smoking and extract or ingesting something that hasn't checked in it to get hot -- that has a next tract in -- that has an extract in it to get high. the extract that most people prefer to smoke is called rosin. that is what the profile specializes in. david: what is he trying to do? he lives in northern california. he sees a real market for this. what is so great about this rosin? >> he is trying to industrialize it. a lot of people in their garage are using straightening irons to
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make rosin. david: industrializing it from that? home,you are making it at which you should not do, he did presses. the key to rosin is that when you smoke it, it gives you a very clean high. glasspare it to nursing a of house red. extract is like using top shelf vodka. it is a cleaner, more potent high. david: sherpas and their story. a documentary shot on the slopes of mount everest. and why warner bros. needs a hit. up next on "bloomberg businessweek." ♪
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david: welcome back to "bloomberg businessweek." in this week's companies and industry section, warner bros. is banking on a big box office
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"batmanfor "pac-ma versus superman." >> beyond that, it is bringing out iconic characters. batman, superman, wonder woman. all its eggs in this basket, and hoping that with all of these characters coming on the screen at the same time that a control in a new fan base for the dc comics and the whole universe they are planning for the move -- for the next five or more years with aquaman, justice league, like marvel did with "avengers." it has developed a fan base for characters like iron man, captain america, and then brought them in together with a big mash-up -- with a big mash-up that had several hits with more films coming out. the pressure is on warner bros. to make a success of this film,
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but at the same time revamp one hasts core franchises that not been as much success as, say, the marvel films have been for disney. david: obviously disney making a lot of hay out of those marvel movies. is this warner just ripping a page out of that playbook? anousha: warner bros. is really trying to tap into the success that marvel has had with its films and building the universe of characters. if warner bros. can have success with this movie, it brings out a lot of possibilities -- spinoffs, sequels, more origin stories of other characters, creating a world of films. if it does not, it has locked itself out of a potentially huge market for the next few years. having said that, some wall street analysts are warning that the market is becoming very concentrated for movies with fewer big hits and more flops.
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so this sort of big strategy that a lot of studios are shifting toward, disney and warner bros. were leading the pack. it is proving a risky bet. david: can a studio recoup $400 million plus with fans of comic books, or are they having to reach out and bring people into the fold who might not know these characters and have a background with these characters? anousha: when you have a movie that is that expensive, you need people of all quadrants, as they say in movie land, young and old, and to get people to come back more than once. david: are these studios doing anything different to get people to their films? anousha: there are a couple of things that are really interesting. warner bros. started off its publicity in beijing, china, which china is now on
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track to become the biggest movie market in the world at the time most of these films have come out, so probably in the next couple of years. so there is that, trying to find a good audience there. but also they have been taking social media and using snapchat. this weekend one of snapchat's usedar filters was being to become batman. the snapchatg discover stories to show more material of these characters. david: another movie that aims issoar to great heights "sherpa," the true story of people who haul hikers up mount everest. >> it was making its debut on discovery channel. it is an interesting documentary, pulled from the
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perspective of sherpas. david: these are the people who help climbers get up the world's tallest mountain. : in 2014 there was an avalanche, and 16 sherpas were killed on the mountain. this movie looks at the sherpas who were supposed to take the climbers that were still at base camp up the mountain. as you can imagine, there was a bit of tension because they did , and the climbers that paid money wanted to go up. you have people paying tens of thousands of dollars to go to nepal and climb this mountain, some with little climbing experience. this documentary exposes people just like that? you have two universes, both on the mountain at the same time. david: "bloomberg businessweek" is available now, on newsstands
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and online. i am david gura. we will see you back here next week. ♪
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oh, hi! micky dolenz of the monkees here, getting ready to host the flower power cruise. (announcer) we're taking the love generation to the high seas and reliving the '60s. we'll celebrate that unbelievable era with the music that made it so special. there'll be over 40 live performances featuring eric burdon & the animals, micky dolenz, the monkees lead singer and cruise host, the 5th dimension, the lovin' spoonful, rare earth, spencer davis, three dog night, and many more! imagine enjoying all that great music on the fabulous celebrity summit, leaving fort lauderdale and making ports of call in jamaica and the bahamas. you'll be back in the days of bellbottoms, peace signs, and so much more, with special theme parties and 20 fun-filled celebrity interactive events. cabins are filling up fast, so come on, relive the era you remember so well.
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the flower power cruise, february 27th, 2017. let your freak flag fly. don't miss the grooviest trip at sea. >> coming up on "bloomberg best," the stories that shape the week in business around the world. a terror attack in brussels. >> clearly it is in our business interests that borders remain open. >> we should not overreact to this. nejra: twitter celebrates a big anniversary. bloomberg covers it all, from apple -- >> it was a profitable company for a long time. nejra: influentials people

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